Twitch.tv COO Kevin Lin On How The Future PUBG Experience Could Look Like

In an interview with GamesIndustry.biz Twitch.tv’s co-founder and COO Kevin Lin. He gave some interesting answers that could change the way we experience PLAYERUNKNOWN’s BATTLEGROUNDS and alike titles completely. New interactive mechanics could allow the viewers to directly impact the gameplay. In one of our previous posts, Johan Drake already mentioned interactive tools that could improve the viewing experience of PUBG.

We’re thinking about ways to expand the number of streams coming out of a game so that viewers have selection. We started testing this with PUBG and H1Z1, where in an ideal world viewers can pick their favourite player and follow them through the match but still listen to the commentary.

While this kind of game observation isn’t something new since Valve’s GOTV for Counter-Strike: Global Offensive already allows every viewer to observe the match through the observation tool while listening to the broadcast commentary during major competitions. Also Znipe offers a service even more similar to what Lin describes. However, the comment that they have tested a similar feature with PUBG is rather interesting.

It would be super cool to add in that sort of mechanic where the audience can vote, or vote with their money, to help their favourite player or team out. That’s very near.

Most of you will be familiar with such a mechanic thinking back at the “The Hunger Games” books and movies. Tributes could receive gifts such as medicines or weapons right in the arena, impacting their performance and chances to survive. At first glance, this really sounds like a super cool idea for the Battle Royale video game genre but letting this idea sink you realize that a mechanic like this would reduce the whole looting system to absurdity. Although an alike mechanic would create a great new revenue stream for Twitch.tv, game publishers and maybe even the supported streamers, it would be a whole new level of integrating third-party microtransactions that immediately affect the gameplay. Although being great for show matches or special custom games, the integration of such a mechanic would be horrible for competitive gameplay, even in public games.

Alexander Hugo

Alexander studied Media and Communication Management in Berlin and London with additional two years of legal studies in Osnabrück, Germany. The Shotcaller is his second esports related project after founding PENTA Sports in 2014.